Saturday, July 21, 2007

Whose is It?

A man and his son go walking, carrying their metal detector.  They find a Viking treasure trove worth millions.  Whose is it?

Theirs...they found it, with their metal detector, and no one else knew it was there.

The farmer whose field it was in.  It was his field, bought and paid for.

The English Government, it was in England.. it is a national treasure

The descendants of the fhe Vikings who buried it.

The descendants of the people who owned it when the Vikings claimed it, or stole it

Everyone... it is history, a bit of the heritage of everyone, collectively.We all own a share of it. It belongs in a museum so we can all visit it, see it, and enjoy it.

No one.  It is was made and collected by no one living, it has no owner, and no one has any right to it.

7 comments:

plieck30 said...

Now that is a thought to ponder. I've always wanted a metal detector. I would probably be selfish and think if I found it its mine. on the other hand if I was the owner of the land I would think its mine. Yep I vote for the owner of the land. Interesting ponder Chuck. Paula

ggjack7 said...

Maybe I should think this over longer, but right off the top of my head I'd say the finders should be given a substanial finders fee, then the items should be put in a Museum for all to enjoy. gg/Jackie

tendernoggle said...

I think the land owner...but I also tink it should go to a museum too!
love ya,
carlene

hewasolddog299 said...

Split between the finder(s) and the landowner(s) -- see the end of this article:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/north_yorkshire/6906107.stm

By the way, Last time I checked, £750,000 doesn't equate to "millions". Currently, it'd be $1,542,527.48 USD. Still and all, a nice chunk of change to "discover" on your Saturday walk.

valphish said...

I think it would be very fair to split between finder and landowner. xox
http://journals.aol.com/valphish/ThereisaSeason

jmorancoyle said...

    Good question.
Jude
http://journals.aol.com/jmorancoyle/MyWay

jocalodave said...

The "treasure" you refer to, I assume, is composed of precious stones and metals. It could also, I suppose be ancient objects that once had functions -- swords and armor, for example.

It's a shame that this kind of "booty," which is of no practical value, is so highly regarded and that resources that could be used to feed, clothe, educate and heal people are devoted to the acquisition and display of "stuff."

Many have died in search of plunder; too much time and energy has been devoted to physical items of little worth and too little to the things that bring real meaning to life.

"As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler; solitude will not be solitude, poverty will not be poverty, nor weakness weakness."
  -- Henry David Thoreau